Normative Narratives

Transparency Report: Republicans Oppose U.S. Law Targeting Offshore Tax Dodgers

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Original Article:

At its winter meeting in Washington, the RNC approved by voice vote a resolution in favor of abolishing the 2010 Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act (FATCA), set to take effect in July, marking the party’s first explicit attack on the law.

FATCA will require most foreign banks and investment funds to report to the U.S. Internal Revenue Service information about U.S. customers’ accounts worth $50,000 or more. The law was enacted after a scandal involving Americans hiding assets in Swiss bank accounts to dodge U.S. taxes.

Critics have blasted the law as an unfair government overreach and invasion of financial privacy.

“The Republican National Committee … urges the U.S. Congress to repeal FATCA,” said the measure, staking out a campaign position ahead of 2014’s mid-term elections.

Tax watchdog groups that support FATCA slammed the Republican vote. “It is mind-boggling that a major political party would even consider endorsing a resolution to facilitate tax evasion,” said Heather Lowe, director of government affairs at anti-graft watchdog group Global Financial Integrity.

“Repealing the law would cripple the U.S. and global efforts to fight offshore tax evasion,” she said in a statement.

The Center for Freedom and Prosperity, a group that advocates for lower taxes and financial privacy, praised the RNC vote. “The GOP’s adoption of FATCA repeal to its platform is a major victory for taxpayer privacy rights,” said the center’s Director of Government Affairs Brian Garst.

Repeal is unlikely and the issue was not expected to resonate with average U.S. voters, said lobbyists on both ends of the political spectrum. But they said Republican opposition to the law could help the party raise campaign funds.

It is certainly mind-boggling that a major political party would endorse such a view. And even if a repeal is unlikely, this issue should “resonate with the average U.S. voter”. In an era of constant budget-battling and debt-ceiling standoffs (the next one is right around the corner), where stimulus spending is unthinkable and welfare programs are constantly coming under attack (even though both are extremely important during an economic recovery), it is important for Americans to understand the main drivers of U.S. government debt. Once you understand these main drivers, it is obvious why this G.O.P. position on FATCA is unconscionable.

A quick simplified lesson: There are two sides to government debt, receipts (tax revenue) and outlays (spending). While there are certain drivers of long-term spending which must be reformed (social security, and medicaid, and defense spending specifically), these long term issues have little to do with economic recovery fiscal policies (government stimulus spending and “automatic stabilizers“).

A few historic graphs from the White House Office of Management and Budget (full tables from 1938-2012 can be downloaded: reciepts_endpenditure_historyreciepts_by_source) tell the story of U.S. government debt.

RECEIPTS, OUTLAYS, SURPLUS/DEFICIT(–)% GDP | PERCENTAGE COMPOSITION——————————————————————|  OF RECEIPTS BY SOURCE
Year GDP (in billions of dollars) Total Individual Income Taxes Corporation Income Taxes
Receipts Outlays Surplus or Deficit (-)
1992 6,242.0 17.5 22.1 -4.7 43.6 9.2
1993 6,587.3 17.5 21.4 -3.9 44.2 10.2
1994 6,976.6 18.0 21.0 -2.9 43.1 11.2
1995 7,341.1 18.4 20.6 -2.2 43.7 11.6
1996 7,718.3 18.8 20.2 -1.4 45.2 11.8
1997 8,211.7 19.2 19.5 -0.3 46.7 11.5
1998 8,663.0 19.9 19.1 0.8 48.1 11.0
1999 9,208.4 19.8 18.5 1.4 48.1 10.1
2000 9,821.0 20.6 18.2 2.4 49.6 10.2
2001 10,225.3 19.5 18.2 1.3 49.9 7.6
2002 10,543.9 17.6 19.1 -1.5 46.3 8.0
2003 10,980.2 16.2 19.7 -3.4 44.5 7.4
2004 11,676.0 16.1 19.6 -3.5 43.0 10.1
2005 12,428.6 17.3 19.9 -2.6 43.1 12.9
2006 13,206.5 18.2 20.1 -1.9 43.4 14.7
2007 13,861.4 18.5 19.7 -1.2 45.3 14.4
2008 14,334.4 17.6 20.8 -3.2 45.4 12.1
2009 13,960.7 15.1 25.2 -10.1 43.5 6.6
2010 14,348.4 15.1 24.1 -9.0 41.5 8.9
2011 14,929.4 15.4 24.1 -8.7 47.4 7.9
2012 15,547.4 15.8 22.8 -7.0 46.2 9.9
2013 estimate 16,202.7 16.7 22.7 -6.0 45.5 10.6

Government expenditures will go down when we experience full economic recovery (and not just a recovery for the top 1%)–that’s why welfare programs are known as “automatic stabilizers”. What will not automatically change are tax receipts, which are at their lowest levels since 1950. The American public has been paying a fairly constant portion of total federal taxes over the past 6 decades through income taxes–between 40-50%. Corporate taxes have fluctuated wildly; between 1940 and 1967 they made up 20-30% of federal tax revenue, since 1980 they have hovered around 10%.

The American public continues to pay its fair share, while corporations get a pass (and actually get huge bailouts and subsidies). America, in reality, has a regressive tax system. This low effective corporate tax rate stems largely from tax loopholes; a difficult problem to address rooted in corporate lobbying (money buys influence buys loopholes). Overcoming this problem will take an overhaul of the government tax code and a change in the current lobbying system, neither of which is an easy task.

Much less contentious should be targeting offshore cash holdings. While loopholes at least (allegedly) contribute to job creation, offshore tax evasion is a crime which robs the U.S. of vital tax revenues with no benefit to society. But even this “slam-dunk” reform is being challenged by the G.O.P.

Privacy Narrative:

I thought it was interesting that the Center for Freedom and Prosperity, a conservative think-tank, used the privacy narrative to justify the G.O.P. stance on FACTA. This reminded me how Matt Taibbi, in his book “Griftopia”, explains how the wealthy sell financial sector deregulation to the lay-man.

According to Taibbi, financial regulation is equated to local / state level government regulation–the average person, who experiences government overreach in their day-to-day lives, feels for the “poor banker trying to earn a buck”. Of course this equation is false; however, many people do not know enough about our political system to understand this fallacy, especially when their favorite news outlets are driving this false narrative home.

It seems that something similar is being attempted with this privacy narrative. One of the main issues of the day is NSA “spying”. Perhaps conservatives are trying to latch onto this privacy narrative to drum up popular support for repealing FACTA. I think this is a tougher sell, although financial deregulation sounded like an impossible sell until pundits begin selling it. It is therefore important to expose this fallacy to the general public before the narrative hits the newsroom.

Next time you hear an argument about “fiscal responsibility”, remember the G.O.P is the party of offshore tax evasion. Social spending programs and the tax code need to be overhauled; these issues will take time to remedy and must be addressed with care, they cannot be attached to short term issues like economic recovery or the debt ceiling.

Enabling offshore tax evasion by repealing FACTA benefits nobody except those who engage in offshore tax evasion–this should not be a contentious issue. Those who engage in such activities do not deserve our understanding or support, regardless of your stance on NSA surveillance.

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3 thoughts on “Transparency Report: Republicans Oppose U.S. Law Targeting Offshore Tax Dodgers

  1. Ben,
    Given America has the highest level of wealth inequality, and nations are facing pressure on tax havens (an industry which has operated in a big way for decades), those who have used the accountants and lawyers to make their stashes are doing what they can to allow the stashing to continue. You may be familiar with International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (icij.org) who broke the tax haven story open, publishing names of British Virgin Islands tax cheats. The wealthy of every country use tax havens without any concern for their home country’s citizens. USA, Russia, Britain, China it doesn’t matter – all wealthy use the schemes of the big four accounting firms and highest priced law firms. Not only present taxes, but retroactive taxes owed, back over twenty years, should be recovered. People like David Cameron, who has been well aware of tax havens for many years before ICIJ’s expose, now are all so “outraged” by an industry (and it is an industry) that has been helping individuals and corporations hide trillions for decades.
    Thanks,
    Jerry

    Like

  2. Hi Jerry good to hear from you,

    You are absolutely right, it has been a problem for a long time. Now that money is “tight” due to recession, governments are starting to rail against practices they used to look the other way on.

    Not to mention the embezzlement of funds by the rulers of less developed countries. Often these rulers extract natural resource rents and park the money oversees where it cannot be touched. It is disgusting, it perpetuates inequality and stymies economic development, and it is a global problem which will require policy coordination to tackle.

    The U.S. is a global trendsetter, and it taking action through FACTA is a good start. The G.O.P. cannot be allowed to repeal FACTA.

    Like

  3. Pingback: Economic Outlook: Obama’s Shift Sights From “Grand Compromise” to Grand Vision | Normative Narratives

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